Interview with photojournalist Erik Mesori

Interview with photojournalist Erik Mesori
International Photography Grant 2019

How did you get into photography?

I got the inspiration at secondary school, everyday I went into my class and got snaps of my classmates for fun,day by day I improve my view because i really liked to collect memories and tell stories.

Where do you get your creative inspiration from?

When I was teenager, I was very curios so I spent a lot of time watching documentaries and magazines. Growing up I have been more in focus about social justice and conflict projects

Which photographer(s) has been the greatest influence on you?

James Nachtwey, Horst Faas, Don McCullin, Sebastião Salgado.

What is it like being a photojournalist this days?

To be a photojournalist in this age, means to be responsible. There are some stories that we can not ignore and photojournalists have to spend a lot of time and energy reporting them. It is hard now because the media industry is changing so quickly, but we don’t have to change to way we tell the stories just for the market.

What is your most memorable story in photography?

I don’t have a memorable piece in my portfolio. I love all my projects, someone are more famous then others, but I love all my project and I really love my job.

Which series/project was most challenging for you so far?

All projects are different, they are unique so I can not tell which project will challenge, as they all have their own unique challenge. While standing on the edge of a mass grave in Kosovo, I first realized how critical our work can be. Being there meant sharing the horrors of war and feeling the pain of the survivors. I looked into the eyes of a father searching for the remains of his sons and immediately knew that what I was doing was important – that I had a responsibility to share these images with the world. My career has taken me through many different situations since that time, but the experience has stuck with me and motivated me to do my absolute best to get the stories out there. I don’t think photojournalism can change history, but I do think photojournalists can show people things they might never have known about with a concerned, compassionate and critical eye.

What do you do besides photography?

I spend my life like anyone: having fun with friends and family (when I am at home) taking days off reading books or driving my car on a day journey

What is your favourite photography book?

Inferno: Jamas Nacthwey

What are your future plans with photography?

I am a member of a new collective Capta (capta-images.com). I think it is important work in a good team, just like this you can grow up as photographer, sharing experiences and having support by your team to cover new stories.

Website: www.erikmessori.com

A Kosovar woman prays at the grave of her son was killed during the war. The son's body was found in a mass grave not far from Krusa e Madhe

A Kosovar woman prays at the grave of her son was killed during the war. The son’s body was found in a mass grave not far from Krusa e Madhe

A United Nations forensic pathologist, examines the remains of an unknown girl, about 8-10 years  old, found in a mass grave

A United Nations forensic pathologist, examines the remains of an unknown girl, about 8-10 years old, found in a mass grave

Members of a Kosovar family cry at the memory of their loved ones killed or missing, their names are written on the plates of the Wall of Memory of Gjacova

Members of a Kosovar family cry at the memory of their loved ones killed or missing, their names are written on the plates of the Wall of Memory of Gjacova

photojournalist-erik-mesori-04

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

photojournalist-erik-mesori-05

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

A panoramic view of one of the few remaining green areas in this mining district. Deforestation and pollution from cancer-inducing particles have completely destroyed the local agricultural economy.

A panoramic view of one of the few remaining green areas in this mining district. Deforestation and pollution from cancer-inducing particles have completely destroyed the local agricultural economy.

In Dhanbad medical clinic a miner looks at his chest x-ray picture, seeing the devastating effects of pollution which left him with only one compromised lung.

In Dhanbad medical clinic a miner looks at his chest x-ray picture, seeing the devastating effects of pollution which left him with only one compromised lung.

A miner bathing in the river to clean his skin from coal dust and pollution.

A miner bathing in the river to clean his skin from coal dust and pollution.

some objects on the floor of the nursery school of Pripyat The most terrible technological accident of human history knows: Chernobyl, once an unknown place in the rich land of the Ukraine. Now a single chilling word that still casts a dark shadow of death and contamination. Twenty years after the disaster that struck Europe, the tragedy continues. Many people live in villages close to the nuclear plant in conditions at the edge of human survival. The damage is still very much in evidence. Everywhere, in this area called THE ZONE, there is the burdensome heritage of disaster and everything still remain in total silence. The Chernobyl accident generated unknown victims by effects, it is impossible to know how many people dead for the consequences. The issue of long-term effects of Chernobyl disaster on civilians is controversial. Over 300,000 people were resettled because of the accident; millions lived and continue to live in the contaminated area. On the other hand, most of those affected received relatively low doses of radiation, there is little evidence of increased mortality – cancers or birth defects among them – and, when such evidence is present, existence of a causal link to radioactive contamination is uncertain.

some objects on the floor of the nursery school of Pripyat
The most terrible technological accident of human history knows: Chernobyl, once an unknown place in the rich land of the Ukraine. Now a single chilling word that still casts a dark shadow of death and contamination. Twenty years after the disaster that struck Europe, the tragedy continues. Many people live in villages close to the nuclear plant in conditions at the edge of human survival. The damage is still very much in evidence. Everywhere, in this area called THE ZONE, there is the burdensome heritage of disaster and everything still remain in total silence. The Chernobyl accident generated unknown victims by effects, it is impossible to know how many people dead for the consequences. The issue of long-term effects of Chernobyl disaster on civilians is controversial. Over 300,000 people were resettled because of the accident; millions lived and continue to live in the contaminated area. On the other hand, most of those affected received relatively low doses of radiation, there is little evidence of increased mortality – cancers or birth defects among them – and, when such evidence is present, existence of a causal link to radioactive contamination is uncertain.

a child is undergoing chemotherapy in the treatment of 'hospital in Kiev The most terrible technological accident of human history knows: Chernobyl, once an unknown place in the rich land of the Ukraine. Now a single chilling word that still casts a dark shadow of death and contamination. Twenty years after the disaster that struck Europe, the tragedy continues. Many people live in villages close to the nuclear plant in conditions at the edge of human survival. The damage is still very much in evidence. Everywhere, in this area called THE ZONE, there is the burdensome heritage of disaster and everything still remain in total silence. The Chernobyl accident generated unknown victims by effects, it is impossible to know how many people dead for the consequences. The issue of long-term effects of Chernobyl disaster on civilians is controversial. Over 300,000 people were resettled because of the accident; millions lived and continue to live in the contaminated area. On the other hand, most of those affected received relatively low doses of radiation, there is little evidence of increased mortality – cancers or birth defects among them – and, when such evidence is present, existence of a causal link to radioactive contamination is uncertain.

a child is undergoing chemotherapy in the treatment of ‘hospital in Kiev
The most terrible technological accident of human history knows: Chernobyl, once an unknown place in the rich land of the Ukraine. Now a single chilling word that still casts a dark shadow of death and contamination. Twenty years after the disaster that struck Europe, the tragedy continues. Many people live in villages close to the nuclear plant in conditions at the edge of human survival. The damage is still very much in evidence. Everywhere, in this area called THE ZONE, there is the burdensome heritage of disaster and everything still remain in total silence. The Chernobyl accident generated unknown victims by effects, it is impossible to know how many people dead for the consequences. The issue of long-term effects of Chernobyl disaster on civilians is controversial. Over 300,000 people were resettled because of the accident; millions lived and continue to live in the contaminated area. On the other hand, most of those affected received relatively low doses of radiation, there is little evidence of increased mortality – cancers or birth defects among them – and, when such evidence is present, existence of a causal link to radioactive contamination is uncertain.

A member of Martinaj family doesn't want pictures and a body guard put tried to cover the lens.

A member of Martinaj family doesn’t want pictures and a body guard put tried to cover the lens.

Ndoci checks every movement looking through the window, it is forced to live closed in the house, he could be the next victim of the revenge between his family and the rival clan.

Ndoci checks every movement looking through the window, it is forced to live closed in the house, he could be the next victim of the revenge between his family and the rival clan.

photojournalist-erik-mesori-16

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

photojournalist-erik-mesori-17

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

photojournalist-erik-mesori-18

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

photojournalist-erik-mesori-19

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

photojournalist-erik-mesori-20

Photojournalist Erik Mesori

Comments

comments

International Photography Grant 2019